Little Girl Lost

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the rainbow comes and goes,
and lovely is the rose,

the moon doth with delight
look round her when the heavens are bare,

waters on a starry night
are beautiful and fair;

the sunshine is a glorious birth;

but yet I know, where'er I go,

that there hath passed away a glory from the earth.

An old school friend of mine lost her mama this week.  Her mama was Clara, a lady whose life converged with my family’s history and made our story better for having her in it. She was a beautiful, gentle, loving person, a special friend to many; but to her children she was the beginning of love itself.  To not have her here with them now must be so hard to come to terms with.

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there is beauty even in the end

Losing your Ma is a journey I know well.  It’s the trip you never want to take, the inevitable traverse through times that test and trouble the very fabric of our identity. Because, who are we without our mothers? Can we walk through life without them? Can we possibly take the torch of their wisdom in our families and communities… are we even ready for that?

I remember how Mum’s death was a relief and also a shock. We’d been with her as she battled seven years of cancer. So it was a relief to know the pain was gone, the struggle ended. But I wasn’t prepared for the finality of death. The absolute ‘gone’ of death. No more smiling waves and see-ya-laters. No more one-more-times.

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The strongest feeling I had the day of my Mum’s death was a feeling of being little girl lost. I remember being about four, lost in the shopping mall. It was a terrifying feeling; an empty wide chasm of fear and abandonment opened up in my little heart.

I retraced the way we had come, hoping to find her back in time. She was nowhere. The tears obscured my vision, I sat down and howled. A nice lady took my hand and led me to the mall head office. I was placated with a lollipop and the loudspeaker called my Mum. When she found me there, my relief was complete.

Losing her to death reminded me of that feeling I’d had as a child. I didn’t know if I could do life without her. I didn’t know how I could carry all the weight of my love for her, now I couldn’t give it to her anymore.  I wished there was a Universal loud speaker system that could bring her back to me.

In some ways, there is. I see her in the beauty of life, even in the peonies that are slowly fading in the vase. I feel her when I am mothering like she did. I hear her words coming out of my own mouth and I see her expressions in my daughter’s beautiful face.  I didn’t know if I could do life without her, but I have. I didn’t think I could carry all that love, but I do. Sometimes, I give some of it back to myself.  I mother myself because she can’t do it anymore.

I still cry a lot about losing my mum. Things set me off. Like trimming our Christmas tree, or a song, or seeing a mother and her grown daughter meandering together through a mall.  Sometimes just talking with my siblings or hearing a laugh like hers can do it. Seeing my children do something my Mum will never see them do. Watching from afar as Clara’s family gracefully carried her through her final days. The triggers are everywhere. The sudden upsurges of grief never far from overwhelming me.

I will always miss her. I will always yearn for her to be here with me still. That’s the nature of love.  There’s no time limit on grief, it is just an ever present part of life without her.

This poem meant a lot to me during the early days of Mum’s absence.  I return to it, days like today, when we are remembering the beautiful woman that Mum’s friend Clara was. She will be so missed.

Daniella, Geoff and all of the Tabor/Ila clan, my heart is with your hearts. It is so hard to travel the days without your Mama. I know you will find strength in what remains behind. But I wish she hadn’t had to leave so soon. I imagine in heaven, our mamas will be together.  It’s nice to think of them together.

Love to you all from my family. Clara was one in a million. A truly beautiful soul.

we will grieve not, rather find
strength in what remains behind;
              
in the primal sympathy
which having been must ever be;
              
in the soothing thoughts that spring
out of human suffering;
              
in the faith that looks through death,
in years that bring the philosophic mind.

The poem is ‘Intimations of Immortality’ by William Wordsworth.

The flowers are my vase of peonies that I can’t bear to throw away; every day they seem more beautiful, even as they draw near to the end.

Mothering Myself

This morning I woke up in my hotel room, feeling rested and calm. I stretched one foot out to the right, one arm out to the left, sliding them along the crisp white hotel sheets that I would never have to heave out of the washing machine.  The smile spread from the corners of my mouth all the way to my ears while my eyes stayed shut. It was beautiful. I’d gone to bed at 9pm and my watch informed me that eleven hours had passed between. Eleven. Deep sleeping hours!

For the good of our souls, sometimes just need a break from all the relational roles we carry.(2)

I woke, packed up my things and prepared for the day. I’m down in the hotel bar now having a coffee before I meet the beautiful Sarah, in person, at last. She’s an all-time favourite blogger of mine. The coffee was made for me by a barista who spoke about the complexity of the bean with an earnestness. I smiled at him, but thought about how I will not have to stack that cup in the dishwasher, or refill a kettle, or check the expiry date on that milk.  Just drink it.

I am such a fan of Sarah, as a writer and a person. Meeting her is very important to me.  I can’t wait to wrap her up in a big hug of thanks. To enjoy food and conversation with her and Annette from I Give You the Verbs! Dear Kate had to go and do some very exciting new work stuff, but you can check out her blog here (next time, Kate!) After our bloggy brunch, Miss Annette and I are lighting off for the Yarra Valley for a girls weekend. We’ll take the meandering way, and she promises that I can stop and take pictures to my heart’s content along the way.

Sarah, Annette and Rach
Sarah, Annette and Rach

This trip to Melbourne is something I’ve been longing to do for years. A chance to revisit my past, reconnect with people I haven’t seen for years and finally meet some I’ve been talking to online for a long time. But even more than the gorgeousness of all that, this trip, for me, is all about respite. I just needed to take some time out from all of the ‘adulting’ and be me, on my own, for a bit. The Rach who isn’t looking after anyone but herself, just for a few days.  I need to mother myself.

I need to stretch out, on a big big bed, all alone. To stand next to my soul sisters and spread my arms wide to the sky. To sleep and wake when I feel like it. To please myself doing anything I feel like doing; compromise free. I’ve explored, I’ve shopped, I’ve chatted and I’ve been blissfully quiet. I’ve drunk wine, I’ve taken a trip down memory lane at my old boarding school, I’ve eaten anything and everything I feel like eating without a single bite being cooked by me.

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It’s been gloriously selfish and deeply important for me to do all that.

When you become a mum, you don’t know that you are becoming something other than an ‘individual’. It’s something you have to learn. And once you have learned that by heart, there won’t be respite for a long, long time. My kids are now 8 and 11. The teenagers are now 17 and 18. The family has grown to a point that I’ve been able to set them up to manage their lives without me for a few days. The hubster is doing a stellar job with them. Their schedules are all being met.

I could probably have done this earlier, but I wasn’t internally strong enough to push for it. Sometimes, even with great families, it does take pushing for it. You have to fight for yourself the way you’d fight for your brood.

Respite is something we need to fight for as women, as givers, as mothers and wives. For the good of our souls, sometimes women just need a break from all the relational roles we carry. Freedom to just be ourselves, to turn the nurturing inward. To have a rest from all of that responsibility.  That’s what I’m doing.

I highly recommend it.

It might not be a trip to Melbourne. Maybe, if you have one, it’s a visit to your Mum’s place. Or camping in the spring, all alone. Or a solo movie. It might be a journey to see your cousin, or a drive down winding country roads. Find your respite, sisters of mine. I promise it will feed your soul and bring you joy.

It might be easier than you imagine to make it happen.

Go on.  Tell yourself to have and break and then, for goodness’ sake: go do what you’ve been told!

Getting Grown-Up

Happy New Year

Every New Years my hubster and I sit out on our balcony after the kids have gone to sleep.  We eat fancy cheeses, oat crackers, pepitoes and plump olives… and my favourite; grilled artichoke hearts.  We toast another year. We talk about how it has been and stubbornly focus on the achievements, congratulating ourselves for what we have managed.  Then we plan the next year together. As the years pass and my body presents more challenges, we’ve been surprised by how much we can still do.  Together.  2014 has been a good year for us as a couple. It’s been good for us as a family.

It’s taken all year, but our minor renovation downstairs is complete. Happy sigh! A good year for finishing things, tying up loose ends.  Getting more organised.  We are starting to feel like grown ups. I turned forty this year; next year, he’ll turn fifty.  Takes a while, getting to this grown-up feeling!  Once upon a time, we used to go to New Year’s Eve parties.  That’s just not feasible anymore, and you know what?  We don’t even miss the sparkle and excitement, the social stress, the late night, the hangover.  Last year we rang in the New Year at 10pm and tucked ourselves up in bed.  It was perfect.

We have a decoration on our tree, it is a hanging, lidded gift box, crammed with tiny notes.  This year, when we were decorating the tree, my son asked me what all the folded pieces of paper inside were. He had never noticed them before.  They are all our plans for all the New Years. Written in tiny script, hopes and goals and aspirations, folded into the smallest possible wad and added to the years before.  I showed him and his interest skipped off elsewhere, the way it does when you are seven and Mum shows you something less magical than you expected. We, however, always look at previous years nostalgically when we add a new one! It’s amazing how many of them have come true.  Is that because we wrote them down? Planned for them?  Is it really that simple?

What are you planning for in 2015?

Next year holds so many unknowns for me.  I am supposed to start IVIG treatment.  That will run for six months. I’ve been accepted into a leadership programme, for people who show promise as a voice for social change.  For me, that means really working on using my voice to promote understanding of invisibile illness and invisible disability in New Zealand, building leadership skills, increasing my network.  It’s an incredibly cool opportunity, but I don’t know yet if the first will preclude me from the latter, I’m waiting for some dates to know for sure. I feel like I am suspending my excitement in case it doesn’t all fall into place.  But, OH!  What if it does?!

What is certain for me about next year is that I will be wife-ing, mothering, writing, and getting involved with life in as many ways as I can.

I’ll be spending a bit of time (as much as I can manage) out in the countryside, where my daughter rides; drinking in the goodness of green paddocks and the sweet smell of horse feed.  I’ll be stroking the warm neck of her wise and good pony and watching my girl follow her bliss, hair flying out behind, grin on her face.  It’s the best soul food on the planet, watching your children do the things they love.

I’ll be wrapping my arms around my little guy as often as I can. I feel that he is moving on up into a new stage and the little boy sweetness of his cuddles is making way for boundless, urgent energy. He’s a big kid now, a purple belt in karate, a story-writing, poison-ball-tramp-champ-justice-leaguer. He’s growing up and I am treasuring the last vestiges of my baby boy.

I’ll be working on some more pro-active health measures.  I want to improve my gut motility somehow, so I am going to work on what I feed it, I’ll be giving my intestines a rest in the very early New Year by starting a liquid diet.  I had a gastrograffin study which showed, when compared with my recent gastric emptying study, that liquid transits through my intestines with much more ease than solid food. So goodbye cake! I’ll be souping it up instead (know any great soup recipes?). I also want to do all that I can for my general mobility and my fitness, so I am going to the rehab centre to work on my exercise program. I’m excited and hopeful about what that might do.

I’ll be here, blogging about my life with dysautonomia, and all the other things besides.  I’ll be connecting with you over on my Chronic-ills of Rach facebook page. I’ll be emailing, advocating, writing and doing the work I have been given to do.  There is so much more of it.   Hang around with me, I’ve just got this feeling that 2015 is going to be a good one!

How do you celebrate New Years?  Can you?  Do you have little rituals too?

The Inverse of Adverse

…mothering from a place of pain…

Sometimes, for my writing gigs about parenting, I feel like there are two categories of mother in this world. It’s probably because I write for both groups. I’d like to write for Dads too, but I don’t relate as naturally to the Dad things. When I see a mothering issue, my writerly mind starts to turn it over from the points of view of two types of mum. The healthy mums and the sick mums.

Of course, it’s much more complex than that, because all mothers face diverse challenges every single day.  Many mums we see in the ‘healthy’ camp, are in fact carrying interior burdens they would cringe to let out into the daylight of public opinion, I get that.  There’s a huge crossover between those camps. Life is an imperfect art and really crap things happen all the time. You might be in the midst of creating the most intricately perfect artwork on the canvas of life when it chucks a whole can of turd brown paint over your work. It happens regardless of who you think you are, the category you fit and whether or not the universe recognises that you should have exemption. Your beautiful work of art might not get up on the gallery wall, at least, not until it’s finished. We all carry scars, suffer fresh wounds.  We all have reparation work to do.  The Bad Stuff happens everywhere, even when it doesn’t look like it.

The other day, I picked up one of my kids.  I recognised the car in front of me as one of my friend’s.  I didn’t get out of my car to say hi (although I wanted to.  I am learning to look after my limitations better so I can cope for longer in my upright world).  She knows me, she knows my stuff.  So I sent her a message on my phone, from one driver’s seat to another  “Hello Beautiful!” I tapped.  Because she really is bona-fide beautiful.  This Mum is the sort of Mum that other Mums look at and their insides sink.  She looks perfect.  A tiny little frame, perfectly groomed hair and face, clothes you wish you had hanging in your own wardrobe… if only they made them ten sizes bigger!  She’s got a few degrees, a chic home. Bright, beautifully mannered children.  Oh, and that car rear I am staring at?  Very nice thank you very much.  The lady’s got class …and the means to show it.
And in truth, I really like her in spite of all that, you know?  😉 She’s personable, approachable, interesting and funny.  She’s a genuinely lovely person.  She slid elegantly out of her driver’s seat and came to chat with me at my window. I was struck by her beauty.  Sigh. Suck in your tummy, Rach.  Put on your smile.  I wonder how she really is?

How she is, really, arrived about two minutes into the conversation, when she revealed that she is facing not one, but two, major health crises.  I stared at her flawless complexion and thought about the torment that must be happening behind that beautiful face. Her vulnerable eyes are shielded by reflective sunglasses. I feel so lost for how to comfort her.  Even though I know it.  I know that torment. The ache of the sick mother.  The loneliness of facing your own mortality in the mirror.  The frustrations when the sick stuff leeches into the mothering stuff.  It’s horrible.  Unfair.  It’s life.

My heart is tuned toward the mums who are mothering while sick.  It’s like I can hear them, sobbing in their wardrobes, hiding from their children. I see the images that haunt their night time dreaming, their fears unleashed in a scape not limited by reality.  I feel their thumping hearts as they consider the most awful possibilities. A final severing of the metaphorical umbilical. The thought of life without them in it.  Carrying on.  Of some other person, filling their dent in the bed, their place in the world. The sick mothers, thinking about their babies, as much part of them as their own pulse and breath.  How can you even begin to prepare your babies for a world you may not be in?  And how can you do that without suffocating them in your arms and trapping them in your presence?  How can you step away from the feelings, to balance your mothering, when you live in fear?

There is so much to be afraid of.  But nothing we can do will change our truth.  Big life stuff is an irrefutable fact. It’s just part of the shape and texture of the life we happen to be living.  It’s real. It’s here. There is freedom in speaking it out. In owning it. And there is relief in surrendering expectation to a new paradigm. And because being sick gives it’s own gift of perspective and gravity;  there is something quite extraordinary that we get to tap into.  We get to mentally jump off the expectations of perfection.  We get to let the pressure drop. We get to focus on the things that matter most of all.  If we are prepared to leap into a new way of viewing our crappy situation.

My mother heart projects forward into the future. I look at my babies, so precious.  I think of the time I have with them.  The length of which, no person knows. As unpalatable as it is, the amount of time any of us have is limited.  I think of the quality of that time and I know my purpose.  I want to help my children to become excellent adults.  Beautiful world citizens who are kind, open-minded, thoughtful and flexible.  I want them to make the best out of the crap life hands them. I want them to make our world better for them being in it.  And there is no more artful way to do that then to teach them how to respond to adversity with grace.  How to take even small opportunities and run with them. I’m a sick Mum.  And it is precisely because I am sick that I have a meaningful context and opportunity to help my children be exceptional people.

I resolve to answer my fears with determination.  My situation is a chance that not every mumma gets. I know the value of my time and the importance of my role. I will teach. I will nurture. I will do these things imperfectly and sometimes flat on my back. I will do them with love and an eye on the people my children are becoming. In every adversity there is a teachable moment.  We can do something beautiful in every ugly, uncomfortable moment. We can guide our babies into fulfilling lives.  Show them how to shore-up, talk about it, get through.  How to keep their eye on the value of every given moment.

Don’t waste it, sick Mummas.  My sisters-in-arms.  Embrace it.

One moment, one day, at a time.

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