Dressing UP

Today’s the day I’ve been waiting for to share something very exciting with you!  My friend wrote a book. And it is a goodie!

This post is a shamelessly enthusiastic plug*  for it. It’s an e-book and it’s packed FULL of stuff you thought you already knew, but then realise you had no idea about. See, she’s that girl who knows her stuff when it comes to organising your wardrobe and your personal style at the same time. And she has put it together in a big bundle of colourful info and useful printables, just for girls like us!

I’m telling you about it because when you find a good thing, woman-code demands it is only right to share it with your friends.
This may just be exactly what you need to inject some calm into your New Year.
I know it has already changed mine.

I was lucky enough to get a sneak peek of this before it went on sale. It got me from the morning ‘what do I wear?’ sigh …to a wardrobe high!   If you need some clever ideas on how to make your clothes work for you, this book may well become your new best friend (it even ‘reads’ like your good friend, the one who is practical but savvy, kind and smart).  If you need to know how to sort your wardrobe or even discover what your style is, in the first place, then it’s for you, too!

For years, my ‘style’ was all about dressing down. Trying to make myself invisible with various combinations of black or, on a daring day, neutrals.  I’d cover it all with a voluminous scarf and hope that no-one noticed me. Have you ever dressed like this?  Back then, my sense of self and fashion had been significantly de-railed by Pandysautonomia; six years of struggling to deal with nasty symptoms and the search for answers and treatment. I spent a lot of time in my pyjamas, or if I was going out, in jeans and t-shirts. I dressed up only occasionally.

Maybe you’re also unwell, or a busy mum (also challenging!) or uninspired. I can’t be the only one who has ever surveyed their wardrobe and lost the will to make an effort.  Over time I forgot how much I used to love fashion.  Forgot that colour makes me happy.

Since going into remission and discovering modelling, I’ve been converted into dressing UP; maybe it is all that trying on of things I would never necessarily pick up in a shop. It broke me out of my old habits. It makes me feel good now, to dress up. Better about myself. More put together. Stronger, more confident. To say that my wardrobe is fit to busting with the most ridiculous array of items now is an understatement because when I got well, I hit the shops running.

But could I find all this loveliness when I needed it? No. My wardrobe itself is sooo small, that’s an issue for sure, but there was no organisation or system going on in there. It was a scary place where all my fashion dreams went to die. I hated trying to come up with outfits I was happy with.

That’s why, when I heard that Monique would be sharing her wardrobe expertise via an e-book, I eagerly waved my hand and asked if I could preview it!  If you haven’t come across her before (she’s the boss lady who convinced me to do that swimsuit shoot), you can check out her style on her instagram feed or her blog. She’s got skills and she is a genuinely lovely person! You’ll like her, I promise.

 

But back to the issue at hand. You see my problem is,

I don’t like people seeing my bedroom.

Even my closest friends. It’s the bottom of my priority list in our home …and looks it, mostly because I can shut the door on it. The shortage of decent clothing storage has meant piles of things overflow from our tiny wardrobe into various stacks and baskets that litter the floor. The ironing table is permanently up, and serves as another place to ‘store’ things.  Argh! It’s a big mess.

I realise I have basically let you all see it, now I have described it!

I’ve dreamed about getting Monique over in her stylist capacity to do a ‘wardrobe edit’ but I can’t bear her seeing the way things are in here! The shame!

Well, Monique doesn’t want any of us to miss out on fashion freedom because of silly reasons like that! So she wrote her book for all of us. People who want to feel in control of their style, their wardrobe and their mornings but might feel embarrassed about their ‘before’ state. Her e-book is a kind, reassuring friendly voice full of practical and fascinating insight. You will thank yourself for getting into it.  I learned so much! I started clearing out that overwhelming fashion wilderness and I’m excited again about dressing up.  So many options I forgot were mine! Are you keen to fall in love with forgotten favourites again, too?

If you’d like to buy Monique’s e-book, there is an early bird special running for this week, where you can buy it for $20. That’s only like five coffees …or three smoothies. And it is worth every cent!  It has already saved me from buying more clothes.  The hubster is ecstatic!!

After the first week it will cost $24 (and is still totally worth it) but get in on the advance price and then you’ll have spare cash to buy me a thank you coffee later (!) Better make it takeaway so we can drink it while we take a tour through the wardrobe in my bedroom. Because now, you can come on in!

click here to check it out!

 

*full disclosure: if you make that (excellent) decision to click through from my blog and buy Monique’s e-book, I will receive an affiliate commission on the sale. I like to know these things when I am reading posts on other people’s blogs, so I’m telling you in case you do too.

Undressing for ‘Dressing Up’

Finding summer swimsuits when you are a curvy girl is all kinds of challenging. Here is my selfie from the Ezibuy fitting room when the togs first hit the shops. I thought if I was prepared and did my research I would surely crack the code for this summer!  As it happened, I didn’t need to because Monique, on her blog, Dressing Up has done the legwork for me and all of us ‘inbetweenie’ and curvy girls. Monique is a friend of mine, and so when she enthused about the vision for her swimsuit edit, I put my hand up. Quickly, before I could change my mind. I know, it surprised even me. These thighs don’t see the light of day very often!

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gimme all the supports please

The location was a sophisticated poolside in Greenhithe, nestled in native forest, bathed in sunlight. I was waddling my way around the location, adjusting my ample thighs, trying to find a position that was most ‘kind’ to my cellulite. But that cellulite was irrepressible.  No matter how much thought-control I used to will it away: it persisted.

I gave up trying.

And that is how, in the harsh light of day, the reality of every dimple of my legs got translated through a lens onto the screens of more than 30,000 people (at last count).  It’s been a freaky few days.

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But how could I let this happen?  You ask.  Do I really want my flaws out there for the whole world to see?  Well, um, yes… kind of!

See, I’ve been on a mission, not exactly to get my kit off, but to accept myself just as I am and to help other women do that, too. To recognise that all of me is okay, not just the bits I think other people will find acceptable.  I am just so tired of trying to live life with the brakes on. It just wears a soul down, living like that.

I’m tired of seeing other women limit themselves too, just because they are ashamed of their ample arms, rumptious bumps, mummy tummies or thunderous thighs.  It feels to me that if I am serious about self acceptance, I will be serious about helping other Curvy Queens to feel more normal about their bodies. That’s why I get in front of a camera so often these days, so girls like us can feel they are not the only one.

Our bodies deserve more credit for what they have brought us through.

Since going into remission I have been busy, and one of the things I have been doing is plus-size modelling. It’s been fun! It’s been mostly rather ‘safe’ in the way mature plus size fashion always is; most places don’t like to show too much of this old girl… so I’ve been modelling sedate numbers like this one:

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‘Yourself’ brand from Farmers, now sold out

Until I met Monique. She is a dynamo woman. A Girl Boss.  She told me about her vision for the ‘inbetweenie’ and plus sized women of New Zealand and I was sold; she’s awesome, highly professional and one of the most enthusiastic people I have ever met. I love her story, I love her methods.

It was to be for this post, it’s been doing really well because it shines with relate-ability. She wanted to show suits on a range different body types.  Her post was all about how everybody already has a swimsuit body, we just need to put the swimsuit on! Is it any wonder we feel shy, when most retailers show their suits only on size 8 girls? It needs to change. Even some of the plus size brands still showcase their suits on size 12 women. They are beautiful women, but size 12 is not plus size. We’ve been labouring under the notion that swimsuit bodies are the ones mainstream media feeds us. Nu-uh. We can wear togs too.

Are you going to join me? This summer: we swim!

It’s time to release ourselves from all the things that hold us back and finally get into the ocean with our families. The idea of wearing the swimsuit anyway, aligns with my feelings about living this life to the fullest. Not walking away from the things that light you up.  Freedom for women, especially from the shackles of our own minds; lights me up.  And so, even though it terrified me, I did it, anyway. I got my kit off in front of the camera.  I’m a size 18-20. My boobs are 18DD/E. And I wore togs in front of the whole crew… and all of you. Eeep.

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Our clever photographer, Nykie Grove-Eades made me feel completely fine about being in a state of undress in front of the lens! When I put the first suit on, I threw my cover-up on top. Then I looked around at all the women, everyone so different. And I thought how ridiculous I was being. I took it off and wandered around just in my cossie. It was the culmination for me, of all the past months of working as a model. Learning to move my thoughts out beyond my own self.

I will however, leave the nudie shots to Taryn Brumfitt (!)  Her documentary, Embrace (have you seen it?) is partly responsible for the new, emboldened me. Thousands of women all over the world are baring all in bold new selfies, but I am more of a keep-the-lady-bits-covered girl. And not just for my sake!

The thing I am burning to address today, is that every single time I do a shoot, no matter what I will be wearing, my brain goes through the same tiring dramas. I wanted to share that with you because I think many of us go through this cycle. The same statements, on repeat. They used to be really loud and sounded compelling, like a ‘truthful’ person, doing you a ‘favour’ by telling you that you are not enough somehow.

The words in my head would be horrible to me about my worth and how pathetic I am. They would tell me that no one wanted to see me. That how I look, who I am, is completely insignificant and irrelevant to everyone. That I was disgusting, gross, obscene. Unlovable.  Laughable.  And exactly who did I think I was?

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One of you. With my lumpy bits and my lopsided tits (!) Realistic. Woman. Roundy and Rumptious. At your service.

What a counterproductive script! I am flipping that script. Slowly but surely, I am standing up to the girl in my head who loves to hate me. She’s shrinking a bit, every day, her voice grows less insistent. She’s learning that she’s not the boss of me anymore.  And oh my goodness, I like it. Why did I let that voice become so powerful?

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When I can make my thoughts shut up, I feel so free!

Have you got a loud, rude voice in your head, too?  Like any bully, that voice is like that because of insecurity.  So if you want to flip the script too, start by saying something reassuring to that inner-child of your soul. Something kind. Offer that anxious creature some evidence to knock down some of that nasty bully bravado. I start with looking at myself square in the mirror and saying “There are millions of other women just like me”.  And then “Every person has beauty”. Those things are facts. Sometimes, I remind myself that thinness is not a virtue, or that fat is not anything to do with my character. My fat is just a fact about me, it is not all of me, nor is it a catastrophic disaster. It’s just fat.

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My dear friend Jo recently told me something her grandmother told her. She said, “Each morning, when you face yourself in the mirror, simply make the best of what you have. Then go out and forget about yourself“. I love that wise advice.
Feeling self conscious? Concentrate on others, listen to them, be present to the people in your life. Because that is the key to true beauty, an outward focus. Connection. Genuine joy is out there, not inside your head, locked up with that aggravating voice of self castigation.

I think Roald Dahl understands beauty best:

“If you have good thoughts they will shine out of your face like sunbeams and you will always look lovely.”

I want to say thank you to Monique Doy from Dressing Up, for the vision and radness she brings to the NZ online world of inbetweenies and plus-size girls. For asking me to be part of this shoot and seeing something in me I did not see. And to Nykie (camera), Natalya (face) and Alice (hair) for making the best of what I’ve got, so I could step out and forget about myself; being truly present to a beautiful experience. Thank you so much. I also want to thank Farmers, KMart, Beyond the Sea, Thunderpants and K&K Fashions. I loved wearing your swimsuits and hat; in them I am going to feel a million bucks doing the towel-to-surf dash this summer!

If you haven’t already, head on over to Monique’s blog, Dressing Up. If you are into instagram you’ll find her here. You’ll love her as much as me. She’s the kind of girl Roald Dahl was talking about, she always looks lovely, for all the right reasons.

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NB:  All photographs (unless stated) in this post are copyright to Nykie Grove-Eades and Dressing Up NZ. They have been used with permission.