International Travel for the Chronically Ill

A couple of years ago, we were told that my illness is progressive.  Although we had suspected, that knowledge had an immediate effect on the choices we were making. We became mindful about making memories.

Children don’t remember the things we necessarily want them to remember, and we know that the small moments of connectedness, the simple pleasures are really profound.  But when we recalled our own childhood memories, so many of the best were holiday memories.  We had been hunkering down, like most of our cohort. Trying to get that mortgage paid off, striving to get ourselves into a really secure financial position. We are pretty conservative people and my husband has a risk-averse approach to finances.  You know the sort…If we want to do work on the house, we save for it first.  So pushing the boat out and taking an overseas family holiday was something we had always seen as a big luxury, something we’d do ‘one day’.  But when that neurologist leaned in and said “do the things you want to do with your family while you are still mobile,” we listened.  We talked about the kinds of things we’d been putting off.  And we booked the holiday-of-a-lifetime.

It was all kinds of joy.  The planning was a beautiful distraction. The anticipation provided a daily dose of optimism mixed with excitement.  A holiday!  It took an enormous amount of planning.  There are so many things to think about when you are travelling sick.  Our four week trip to the States was a wonderful thing.  We have been living off those memories and sharing them together ever since.  Our album is already broken from over use, the kids adore looking through and playing ‘remember when’.  We have no regrets.  Even though so many aspects of the trip were really hard for me, physically, I would go back to those four weeks of family memory-making in a heart beat.  Magic.  That’s what it was.

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And it’s all been on my mind because we’re at it again.
We’re about to head off for a shorter trip, this time to the tropics.  A week on a tiny coral atoll.  It promises to be at least as fantastic as one of Enid’s adventures for The Famous Five (yes, our large family is down to five!).  Epic.  It will be a new thing for the kids and a chance for me to share with them something of what it was like to grow up in Papua New Guinea, not that we’re going back there… but close enough!  My mouth is watering at the prospect of green coconuts, white fish and guava.  I can hear the island music playing…!

Also epic is all the preparation.  In this instance we will be very far from medical help, so I am taking everything that might be needed.  I’m anxious about it from a health perspective, but so very excited from a family perspective.  Bring it on.  We need a holiday.  Bet you do, too.

So anyway, I thought it might be useful if I share eight main things I consider when planning an overseas holiday.  There are so many things extra things to to consider when you are ill, accommodations of the disability sort in addition to accommodations of the bed variety. And all that planning and preparation are worth it.  Making memories is worth every effort.

 

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Here are my tips: International Travel for the Chronically Ill.

Before you begin, give yourself a hefty amount of time to do all the planning.  Don’t book for next week!  It’s not worth the payback your body will put you through!  Plan it all way in advance, even if you don’t know how you’re going to be. It takes a long time to get it all together when you’re sick.

1Consider the destination carefully.  How will the climate and altitude work with your condition?  I’m not saying eliminate destinations based on climate; just choose with the knowledge of how these aspects could impact you.  For example, if you are taking heart medications, you need to know if altitude will compromise their effectiveness.  If you are travelling to extremely hot regions and have thermo-dysregulation, you’ll need some ways to counteract the heat and manage.

1(1)When booking your airline tickets, make sure you have flexible fares that can be changed if necessary.  It is impossible to know when you book whether you will be able to fly when the time comes.  So choose the fares carefully, checking the terms and conditions.  If you can stretch to better seats, do.  Look closely at the airline travel insurance exclusions for pre-existing conditions.  Choose a policy that will cover you for any medical assistance you might need while you are away from home.  If the generic airline insurance won’t cut it, shop around and find one that will.

1(2)While you are booking your flights, you’ll need to indicate if you need ‘meet and assist’.  This will usually prompt the airline to have you fill in a medical form.  Have your doctor fill this in and send it back to the airline.  I also get my doctor to write a generic letter explaining my in-flight liquid quantities (I have to carry extra fluids for long haul), medications and my need to mobilise and/or lie flat whenever possible.  I keep that tucked in with my passport in case it is needed on check in, during processing or inflight.  It’s also good to keep a copy of that approved airline medical form on you.  Remember that if you have mobility issues or implanted devices, you don’t need to queue for immigration.  Flag one of the officers and explain your situation.  They’re usually very happy to help.  The Meet-and-assist service is truly wonderful for ill passengers.  Someone will meet your flight, pop you into a wheelchair and whizz you through all the difficult bits.  If you struggle to stand for long or walk the distances of your average arrivals hall, it’s a godsend.  I don’t generally use a chair but on these occasions I never fail to feel grateful for their invention. It’s a wonderful, compassionate service.  It means you can keep the energy for something more memorable.  And that’s a win.

1(3)If you can, try to plan the flight aspects of your travel to suit your best times of day.  Incorporate rest days and nights between legs of the journey.  In my opinion it is a mistake to push through more than one long haul flight at a time. The benefits of getting some good sleep in between are immeasurable. For our big North American trip, we also mixed up the type of travel.  I find flying very difficult, so we incorporated a road trip as well, with lots of time to get from A to B.

1(4)Consider the types of attractions you’ll be going to.  Will there be standing required?  Walking?  If you are not using a chair, will you be able to manage?  Most attractions can provide you with really sound advice via email. I highly recommend contacting them ahead of time and booking mobility aides if necessary.  In particular, giant attractions like Disneyland need advance booking.  I was surprised to discover when we got there that my walking stick was not allowed to be used because it has a built in seat.  They let me have it when they saw my doctor’s explanation letter (see above) thank goodness I had it with me!  But if I had contacted them ahead of time that wouldn’t have been an issue.  Plan your itinerary to include a range of attractions, it is miserable if everything you are doing involves moving around when that is a challenge for you.  A mix of museums, tours, events, attractions and rest days is a really good idea.  I also planned time when my hubster could take the kids to do things so I could recover and rest.

1(5)Take all of your medications with you and every therapeutic aide that might possibly be needed.  More is more.  But don’t forget to take the original pharmacy label from the box or bottle to show customs.  They don’t like medications dispensed into pill boxes. If they can’t identify what drugs you are carrying you may have to dispose of them.  I do dispense and just cut the labels off the boxes and wrap them in a rubberband. They slide into my inflight toiletry bag.  Yes, I take all my medications on the plane.  All of them for the whole trip, because if bags are lost, my meds are not.

1(6)Documents: Along with your passports, itinerary, booking confirmations and the medical forms discussed above, you may need other information close to hand while you are away. A copy of your prescriptions might come in handy. Research where you are going and what medical services will be available. Record phone numbers and keep these with your travel documents.  It’s a good idea to record all the contact details for your doctors back home and write next to them the time differences from your destinations. You or your travelling companions may need to call them and it saves a lot of stress and expense trying to find their numbers from overseas. Keep these with your documents too.  I also google-translate into the language of my destination a brief description of my health problems and print that out.

1(7)Pack some easy to prepare food or snacks for your own needs.  This might not be important for all destinations. Many of us sickies have particular diet requirements.  For our big trip away, I packed some easy breakfast sachets that I knew I could tolerate and that were a cinch to prepare (add boiling water).  Your preference might be a nutrition shake or other standard item that you know works for you.  When you’re on the road, getting food in time for your medications can be a huge challenge.  Being prepared will ease the stress and make the day unfold in a much better way.

So, there are my tips. Writing them down makes me nostalgic for our last trip and really anxious about this one!  I feel so fortunate to be making this memory with my beautiful family. I promise to bring you back lots of photos and to get some writing done while I am there.   I wonder what writing will be prompted in that beautiful place?  Wish me luck. Wish you were coming along too!

Post Script:
Best laid plans and all… 
1(8)erm.   If you have a pacemaker, remember to take your pacemaker ID card with you.  I have never been asked for it before, but this time I was!  And it was at home in my bedside drawer!  Bahaha!  I had to show them my scar and let them feel the bump before they were satisfied that I wasn’t seeking a pat down just for the fun of it.  I can’t go through the metal detector gates with this little device on board.  I guess the ID card is true of all implants?  If you have one, take it with you!

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Do you have any tips?  Suggestions?  I’d love to add to the list, add your ideas to the comments below…

14 thoughts on “International Travel for the Chronically Ill”

  1. Oh I hope you have a lovely time!

    Did you get med insurance to cover your condition? If so, where from? I would love to know and hubby just asked me to ask you. Haha.

    PS:

    I haven’t forgotten to come visit you, I promise.. Just been dealing with my own and everyone else’s stressful issues and making emergency visits to auckland to rescue the kid. I hope you understand. X

    1. Hi Michele, Air New Zealand has a fantastic insurance product you can buy when you book. There are provisions for pre-existing health conditions 🙂
      Of course I understand! Life doesn’t let up sometimes and you face your own enormous challenges every day. Hope rescue ops were successful! X Arohanui

  2. What a great set of tips there for travelling whilst ill. It is always nice to have something to look forward to. We are already planning our next trip. I hope you have an amazing time and can’t wait to read your post about it. Have fun. Soak in that sun. Relax. Love Sarah xx

  3. So excited for you, hope you all have a wonderful trip! Looking forward to seeing the pics – and what an amazing list of travel tips from the best planner/list maker I know xxxx

  4. This is a comprehensive travel guide. You’ve put so much though and useful info into this that I feel like it should be a booklet offered by the airlines or Travelers Aid! I love the tropics and envy your wonderful trip even before you’ve taken off. Hope everything goes well-xx

    1. Thanks Barb, it is so wonderful to have a happy buzz around the place. The kids keep talking about it and the piles of summer clothes are growing and long check lists are getting crossed off. It is so exciting!

  5. I hope it will be an amazing trip Rachel & it relaxes you inside and out. All the stress will be worth it when you’re lying around in the tropical weather. Can’t wait to hear about it!!!

  6. I wish I’d seen your website before I took my first overseas trip recently from Australia to New Zealand! I was just lucky customs weren’t concerned with my medications. Perhaps if they saw the quantity and types of meds, there could have been problems. For instance, I was carrying 15 boxes of endone and that was just one of my meds. I was making an emergency flight to support my partner who’s sister is dying and took a turn for the worst. I didn’t have much time to plan things, except I made sure I got a fresh dispensing of every med I take, 3 days before I left. Then I also took my “tackle box” style container with my pills just put into divided sections for easy dispensing each day. My doc was really unhelpful regarding my trip, he said he didn’t have time to write me a letter of what I take and why, despite me booking a double appt and it was 2 weeks before I planned to leave. So I asked the pharmacist to help and he printed me a list of all my meds and included my prescription history, so I at least had something for customs. I am lucky my luggage never got lost, I didn’t even give this a second thought!! You’re travelling tips are brilliant! Thankyou! I hope you have a wonderful trip and make some wonderful memories. I intend to travel overseas again one day as soon as I can. I will definitely refer to your tips next time.

    1. Hi Ros, last minute trips are a nightmare aren’t they! Sounds to me like you did a brilliant job getting things together at short notice. So much to organise. It’s enough to make my brain pop. I can only manage travel if I’ve had enough warning. I really admire you for managing the trip to support your partner. I hope it went as well as could possibly be expected. Sad times. 🙁
      I hope your next travel experience includes some more joyful experiences. Thanks so much for taking the time to comment!

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