Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS)

I haven’t talked much on this blog about pain.  In fact, for a long time, I preferred to ignore the topic.

Where does it hurt_(1)

Many of my friends in the invisible illness community have concurrent diagnoses of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, and within my own family, my sister has been dealing with chronic pain for most of her adult life. It is a debilitating and exhausting challenge for the body and mind.

I previously had neuropathic pain with my Dysautonomia. Peripheral and abdominal mostly. And then I sustained nerve damage during a gynae surgery three years ago. However, the distractions of my primary diagnosis meant that it wasn’t immediately clear the surgery was the cause of my pain. I’d had a steroid injection to the site after the surgery, then gradually over time, my pelvic pain returned and increased. It affected my gait and had a dramatic impact on my mobility. Walking with a cane possibly exacerbated it, but without it I would have been unable to walk further than ten metres. It hurt so much. The pain extended from the left inner pelvis, down the middle of my left leg into my ankle. I found osteopathy helpful. I took pain medications (gabapentin and oxynorm) and modified my life. I thought that it was just another curve ball thrown at me by my dysfunctional body. I didn’t connect it with the gynae surgery. Or at least, not until after the six months of methylprednisolone infusions; when my pain disappeared completely.  That’s when the lightbulb went on for me.

When an awful symptom is removed and you experience life, pain-free, it makes you acutely aware of how much it was affecting your life.  I realised both how bad that pain had been and how long it had been bringing me low. As I weaned off the steroids, the pain returned.  I had another, more minor, gynae surgery.  This time, the pain post surgery was excruciating. I was certain that some medical misadventure had occurred. The specialist in the hospital explained that they couldn’t find cause for the level of pain I was in. I agreed that a referral to the pain team might be useful.  I was in remission and just had this pelvic issue to sort out.  Eager to get beyond it, I was keen to try anything.

The Gynaecology Pain Team have been so wonderful. I see an anaesthetist, a pelvic phsyiotherapist and a psychologist.  They believe that pain is exacerbated by a number of factors, and first introduced me to the concept of complex regional pain syndrome. This is what my psych wrote in her last clinic letter:

“We concluded that following 32 years of neuropathic pain from [auto-immune neurological disorder -Pandysautonomia] and three years of neuropathic pelvic pain she will, in all probability, have central nervous system sensitisation”.

That just means that my nerve pathways over time have amplified my pain signals. My body is in pain, and the pain I feel is more extreme than might be felt in the same scenario by someone who hasn’t been experiencing chronic pain for a long time. The longer you have pain, the worse it feels.  But don’t worry, things are in hand here; I am managing fine with all of the measures we have put in place. I have another surgery scheduled for August, when hopefully we will have a clear direction for treating the nerve pain. I am hopeful we can reduce it significantly.

I thought there might be others who can relate to this part of my story. If you want to read more about CRPS, look here.  If you are in New Zealand and have been diagnosed with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome too, you could join this facebook page. And for a quick overview of invisible illness (yes, CRPS falls into this category) have a look at this  clever infographic by Victoria from www.burningnights.orgThank you so much for sending me your infographic, Victoria.

 

Source: http://www.burningnightscrps.org
Source: http://www.burningnightscrps.org

 

 

2 thoughts on “Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS)”

    1. Me too, Jessie! Life is still light years better than before I went into remission, but the pain can bring me down sometimes. It’s a juggling act. I’m hoping a steroid injection directly to the site where my uterus has been stitched to my pelvic ligament (where the pain seems to be coming from) will do the trick, but the anaesthetist questions whether it has been going on too long for that to be effective. I don’t think so, because the pulse doses of methylprednisolone did the trick! If only I could have safely stayed on them!

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