Top Tips for Chronic Illness Patients

These are my best ideas for dealing with chronic illness.  Got some I haven’t thought of?  Share your ideas in the comments, I’d love to know your thoughts…

Picture of a girl in a robe, asleep on the sofa and the words 'top tips for dealing with chronic illness'

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Learn: find out for yourself, anything you can on your condition so you can make good decisions about your care.

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Manage the symptoms:  follow the recommended treatments given by doctors, including taking all medications at the correct times. Use an alarm system or app to help you remember.
Plan for proper nutrition, engage in a recommended exercise program if you can.

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Observe:  Know what triggers your symptoms, if anything. Learn to pace. You know your limits better than anyone else.  Sometimes, challenge your limits a little. It’s okay to try things to better assess your capabilities as they change.

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Rearrange:  Identify the things in your home that can be re-organised to make daily tasks easier. eg. We have just installed a high bench in the laundry so I don’t have to bend down to do the washing. Changing things can help you maintain more independence.

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Enquire:  Ask away! Ask your doctor, social worker and anyone else involved with your care about the services available to you.  Ask online support groups for advice. These people have often been navigating these waters longer than you.  They will have invaluable ideas to help.

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Talk:  You need to continue to talk to the people in your life who are involved in your care. Don’t give up on expressing your needs.  If they don’t know, how can they help?  Just make sure you also keep up the listening part of the communication equation.  The talking and listening is so important, especially in your primary relationship. Try not to shy away from the hard conversations, persist with them until you find resolution, because in the resolution you’ll find peace and connection again.

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Redefine: what your roles and responsibilities are.  Discuss these with your partner, family, friends.  You might need to sometimes be assertive to help people understand the things you can and can’t do.

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Prioritise:  Decide what really matters to you in any given moment and congratulate yourself for prioritising that.  See if you are spending too much energy on tasks or people who are detrimental to your wellbeing.  It might be time to take some things out of the picture.

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Plan:  set realistic goals for your day and try to adopt a kind of structure. Eating at regular intervals can be hard to manage, but it is really important if you are taking medications.  Plan your food in advance whenever you can so that it will be easy to get to and eat. You might need to ask for help to get your food organised for the day. Avoid spontaneous activities if you don’t have the supports or circumstances in place to make it work for you.

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Reinforce:  how valid and useful you are by finding ways to empower yourself.  Being creative is a wonderful way to remember how unique and special you are. It’s also a great distraction.  Find ways to express your own skills and talents and explore all the ways you are able. This detracts from the focus of all the ways you feel dis-abled.  Think of things you can do and get into doing them.  For me, it’s writing… blogging has been a wonderfully empowering tool.  And I can do it in bed!

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Reframe:   Taking a different perspective from the negative is a powerful tool of choice. Being positive can be as simple as seeing the humorous side of a situation or reaching out to someone else who is suffering with some encouragement or acknowledgement. It can make an enormous difference to your emotional well-being.

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Distract:  If you like to be in control, this one is for you.  Man-handle your mind’s focus on your illness by wrestling it into another thought pattern.  Use some strategies recommended by psychologists. Listen to music, do some art, write; get your brain and fingers busy.

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Relax:  Stress worsens the experience of symptoms and leads to increased tension.  Deep breathing techniques, massage, meditation, yoga, tai chi are some things you could try (depending on your physical ability) to improve your relaxation.

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Laugh:  it’s the best medicine. If nothing in your daily experience is tickling your funny bone, seek out laughter.  Search online for funny videos, comedy channels or TV series.

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Get support:  It’s totally normally to be emotional about being chronically ill.  Of course you are!  There is grief for yourself, but also you may find self-blame, anger, frustration, hopelessness, despair.   Seek help among those dealing with your illness.  If you can, find a support group, online or in person. But also, use the mental health help-lines or seek professional psychological help. Friends, family, fellow-sufferers and health professionals can all help you find ways to let go of the sadnesses and find a pathway through.

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Let it Go:  take steps to accept that the old definition of yourself and your old life, prior to becoming ill is no longer relevant to this time you are walking through. Let yourself redefine and create a new meaning and purpose beyond your illness.  I have found that asking by myself  “What sort of person am I?”  rather than “What do I do?” I have a good starting point for this process.  Letting go is not something you’ll do once.  You’ll let go in stages, or you’ll let go over and over.  Just keep your focus on who you are. And be kind to yourself. This letting go is tricky.
*Are you in New Zealand?  If you are and you are registered with a ProCare GP, you may be eligible for funded sessions with a psychologist (no cost to you).  You can find out more about this service by contacting ProCare Pscyhological Services or your GP.   www.psychologynz.co.nz
Some health insurance policies cover psychiatric services or there is always the option to pay for the services of a qualified psychologist.  Call your insurance provider if you have questions about it.

Chronic Illness.  Top tips for dealing with chronic illness.

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